While the Condominium Act, 1998 permits owners to requisition meetings for certain business and for informational purposes, there are limits on what can be accomplished using this process.

Some owners at one of our smaller condo corporation clients recently submitted a requisition to amend the corporation’s general by-law to increase the size of the board from 3 to 7 directors and impose a new qualification that only owners are eligible to be directors.   For the reasons that follow, this is business that cannot be requisitioned by owners.
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The recent Ontario Superior Court case of Hogan v. MTCC 595 demonstrates that some condo boards have not yet read the memo about being responsive to unit owners and exercising common sense. Headshaker cases like this one are worth highlighting as examples of how not to run a condominium.

In November 2013, MTCC 595 notified its unit owners under section 97 of the Condo Act about the board’s plan to make an addition, alteration or improvement to the common elements at an estimated cost of $72,000. As required by subsection 97(3), the notice also advised owners of their right under section 46 to requisition an owners’ meeting to vote on the board’s proposal. Section 46 requires the board to call a meeting on requisition by the owners of at least 15% of the units. 
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